Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Myrtle Bailey and the Japanese Invasion and Occupation of Hong Kong

This is my third entry in my miniseries on the newspaper articles mentioning my great grand aunt, Myrtle Bailey. She lived through extremely interesting historical times in her life as a missionary to China and Hong Kong in the first half of the 20th century which can be broken up into approximately one major historical event per decade, so I’ve divided the miniseries into decades. In the 1940s, Myrtle lived in Hong Kong during the surprise Japanese invasion and subsequent occupation of Hong Kong. She also participated in the repatriation exchange of women, children, diplomats, prisoners of war, and other nationals between Japan and the United States/Canada and other allied nations in 1942.

This decade’s news articles about Myrtle constituted a cross between those of the 1920s and the 1930s for me, in that, like the articles from the 1920s, they did tell an exciting story of what happened, albeit all in retrospect, and, like those from the 1930s, provided many clues for my contextual history research to flesh out the story.


Climbing My Family Tree: ”Missionary Returning” 18 August 1942, The Findlay Republican Courier, p. 13
”Missionary Returning”
18 August 1942, The Findlay Republican Courier, p. 13.
Click to Make Bigger


Transcription:


MISSIONARY RETURNING

Miss Myrtle Bailey Expected to Arrive Here From Brazil Soon

Miss Myrtle Bailey who has been a missionary in Hong Kong China for 26 years is on her way home. Miss Bailey wrote her sister, Mrs. Phillip A. Snyder, that she expected to be here within the next two weeks.

The letter was sent from Rio De Janeiro, Brazil and dated August 1 so that her arrival is now expected daily. This is the first letter Mrs. Phillip Snyder has received since last November. Miss Bailey visited here five years ago.



Climbing My Family Tree: ”Missionary now home” 14 September 1942, The Findlay Republican Courier p. 12
”Missionary Now Home”
14 September 1942, The Findlay Republican Courier p. 12
Click to Make Bigger



Transcription:


MISSIONARY NOW HOME

Miss Myrtle Bailey Hastens Last Lap of Trip from Hong Kong Due To Death of Niece

Miss Myrtle Bailey, for 25 years a missionary in China has returned from Hong Kong to Findlay, which is her home city.

She came in on the steam ship “Gripsholm,” the refugee ship landing in New York City on August 23. Miss Bailey was two months on the voyage across two oceans. She was very weary so was resting for a Few days in New York when she received the sad news of the death of her niece, Mrs. Christine Buntz, victim of an auto accident last week.

Miss Bailey came on immediately and is now with her sister, Mrs. Pauline Snyder, 535 Tiffin Avenue, where she will remain for the present.



Climbing My Family Tree: ”Missionary will tell of Hong Kong”, 19 September 1942, Findlay Republican Courier, p 13.-A

Climbing My Family Tree: ”Missionary will tell of Hong Kong”, 19 September 1942, Findlay Republican Courier, p 13. - B
            "Missionary will tell of Hong Kong”, 
19 September 1942, Findlay Republican Courier, p 13.
                      Click to Make Bigger


Transcription:


MISSIONARY WILL TELL OF HONG KONG

Miss Myrtle Bailey to Speak at Assembly Of God Sunday Evening

The Sunday evening service at the Assembly of God, 406 East Sandusky St., 7:45 p.m. will be missionary in nature. Miss Myrtle Bailey from Hong Kong will tell of her experiences during the invasion by the Japs. Her topic will be “Hong Kong under the Fire of Japanese Bombs.”

Miss Bailey has spent 20 years as missionary in China. She was surrounded by the Japanese military authorities for several months and was among those recently arrived in the United States under the exchange agreement between the two nations.

At 10:45 a.m. service, the pastor, Rev. Benson B. Compton will speak on “a yoke for two That.” It will be the fourth and last of a series of sermons the pastor has been presenting on that theme. The Sunday school lesson, “The Valley of Dry Bones,” is at 9:30 a.m.



Climbing My Family Tree: ”Missionary tells of Bombings” 21 September 1942, The Findlay Republican Courier, p. 3
”Missionary tells of Bombings” 21 September 1942, The Findlay Republican Courier, p. 3
Click to Make Bigger


Transcription:

MISSIONARY TELLS OF JAP BOMBINGS

Myrtle Bailey Relates Experiences in Attack on Hong Kong

“Hong Kong thought it was prepared, but it was caught off guard, “ Miss Myrtle bailey told the Assembly of God, 406 E. Sandusky Street, Sunday Evening.
Miss Bailey has spent 20 years as a missionary in China and lived in Hong Kong during the Japanese bombing.

“The Japanese crept in from the back, camouflaged by weeds and grass. They were in front of Hong Kong before the British saw them move, “ Miss Bailey said. On the ferry on British soldier told her that the Japs outnumbered the Allies in Hong Kong 20 to 1.

“The attack was sudden,” the speaker continued. “First the bombers set fire to the aerodromes then they stormed the warehouses where a two year food supply was stored. The Allies could do nothing but retreat to Hong Kong Island, “ she said.

Most of the damage was done in the tenement districts. Most of the government buildings and banks were saved, she explained.

Miss Bailey said she lived on the mainland at the very edge of Hong Kong’s foreign settlement, next to the Chinese section. The Japanese took the house opposite her for Red Cross headquarters. Three others near her were taken for barracks. One Jap officer lived on the second floor of her home. “They just took what they wanted, “ Miss Bailey said.

The speaker said she was never interned in a camp but was virtually a prisoner in her own home for seven and a half months. She had almost given up hope when word came that she could leave.

When in China Miss Bailey established two missions, two schools, a boys’ and a girls’, opened a Bible school, and kept 15 orphans in her home.

A Red Cross shipment of food stuff was used to aid Hong Kong. Miss Bailey said she had eight large bags in her home when the bombings came. Fifty people were in her home during the bombings.

“I know what starvation is,” Miss Bailey said. “The older girls knitted for the Japs to get food, and the younger girls sold candy and cakes on the streets. We sold our furniture – everything, even to the typewriter.”

Finally word came through a Red Cross representative that she could leave but could only take four suitcases with her. She was on the Japanese Ship Asama Maru until she reached Lourenco Marques. There Gripsholm picked up the refugees and brought them to New York. There were 500 to 700 missionaries on the ship, she said.



Climbing My Family Tree: ”Missionary Will Speak to W. M. S.” 29 September 1942, Findlay Republican Courier, p 5

”Missionary Will Speak to W. M. S.”
29 September 1942, Findlay Republican Courier, p 5.
Click to Make Bigger
Transcription: 

Missionary Will Speak to W. M. S.

The Women’s Missionary Society of St. Paul’s Evangelical Church will meet at 730 o’clock Wednesday evening, September 30, in the church auditorium.

Miss Myrtle Bailey who has spent 25 years in China will give a talk on conditions among the Chinese people and tell of her trip homeward. Both men and women are invited to attend this meeting to hear Ms. Bailey speak.

Mr. M. S. King, president, will have charge of the business meeting. The program committee also has arranged the following numbers for the program.

Devotions in charge of Mrs. Hoker; solo by Mrs. Vera Hummel; outline of new study book by Mrs. Gladys Scothorn; women’s quartet; offering in charge of Rev. L. H. Naumann.



Climbing My Family Tree: ”Leaving for China” 20 September 1947, Findlay Republican Courier, p 9
”Leaving for China”
20 September 1947, Findlay Republican Courier, p 9
Click to Make Bigger


Transcription:

Leaving for China – Miss Myrtle Bailey, who has been visiting with her sister, Mrs. Pauline Snyder, 535 Tiffin Ave., will leave today for San Francisco where she will embark for Hong Kong to return to her work in the mission field which was interrupted by the Japanese invasion five years ago. The mission school and girls school has resumed operation while Ms. Bailey hopes to get a boys school and Bible school started.



 By 1953, all Protestant missionaries had been expelled by the communist government of China.  


Sunday, May 24, 2015

NoteWorthy Reads #14

Climbing My Family Tree: NoteWorthy Reads #14
Picture from Pixabay.com


For me, Noteworthy Reads are articles, websites, or blog posts I found this week which are fascinating, interesting and/or helpful, and occasionally “wacky” or “wonderful” will likely sneak in as well. It’s not going to be a “best of” post because I don’t have the knowledge to make that determination. I don’t even promise that the articles & blog posts will be written that week – just that I found them that week. At the end of each trimester I’ll review the posts to determine which entries should be put in my Resource pages; the rest will still be available through the blog's search function.

Note: Just because I list an article does not mean I endorse its contents. It just means I want to be able to find it easily in the future when I may want to consider the issue in more depth.

I’m still behind in my reading as I went on a mini-vacation, and then things went haywire. Moreso for others than for me, but I was not exempt from some of the stress. Hopefully, things are on their way to working out.

On my mini-vacation, I went to the South Carolina Book Festival, which was great fun, and at which I bought so many books I couldn’t pack them on the plane with me and had to have them all mailed home instead!

In this post, I caught up on the articles I emailed to myself; next week I intend to catch up on my Feedly backlog.


DNA

Study Reveals “Extraordinary” DNA of People in Scotland from the BBC.com (… since I’ve discovered I’m probably mostly Scottish!).

  
GREAT STORIES

52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #17 Gabriel Kerr – Putting Together the Pieces of His Story from the How Did I Get Here? My Amazing Genealogy Journey blog - I found it quite interesting how the author put together Gabriel Kerr's story



HISTORY





INTERESTING ARTICLE

Here Are 40,000 Photos of Old New York Plotted on a City Map from Gizmodo.com – I posted this on Facebook where my NYC & former- NYC friends are having a lot of fun looking at their old neighborhoods and then I realized that it could be of great help or interest to people with ancestors in old New York City, so here it is.


A Double Win from the Legal Genealogist’s blog – interesting: how to find military naturalizations in the records of the United States District Courts

Our Farming Ancestors from the JSTOR/Daily – yeah, most of my ancestors are farmers, too,;this will be helpful


IRELAND



TIPS






  
TOOLS

– this will be extremely useful to me!





USA
NEW YORK





Thursday, May 21, 2015

Myrtle Bailey and the Second Sino-Japanese War


This post is the second entry in my miniseries on the newspaper articles mentioning my great grand aunt, Myrtle Bailey ) (1880-1970). She lived through extremely interesting historical times in her life as a missionary to China and Hong Kong in the first half of the 20th century, about one major historical event per decade; so I’m dividing the miniseries into decades. This second post covers the mid-to-late 1930s when Myrtle lived through the beginning of the Second Sino-Japanese War

The articles I found on Myrtle for the 1930’s were less a story in and of themselves than those in the prior decade, but they provided significant keys for my historical context research. 

Myrtle remained in the Orient as a missionary, now in the British Colony of Hong Kong, for the next several years. During that time, she started and ran four schools. But in or about late 1935 she was injured and sent home to Findlay Ohio for approximately a two-year furlough to heal. She also spent part of that time giving fund-raising talks to numerous churches.




Climbing My Family Tree: ”Will Tell of China” Findlay Republican Courier, 14 November 1936, p8
”Will Tell of China” Findlay Republican Courier, 14 November 1936, p8
Click to make bigger


Transcription:

WILL TELL OF CHINA
__________
Miss Myrtle Bailey of Hong Kong, Will Describe Mission Work in Far East
__________
Miss Myrtle Bailey, missionary from Hong Kong, South China, who has returned here for a furlough after 19 years in the field, will speak at Bethel Temple, on Ash Ave., Sunday at 11 a. m. and 8 p.m.

Miss Florence Cannell, a coworker who has been in China for five years, will assist Ms. Bailey in the services. She is a native of the British Isles.

Ms. Bailey will wear Chinese apparel during talks at various churches here during her stay.



Climbing My Family Tree: "To Hear Missionaries” Findlay Republican Courier, 24 November 1930, p3
"To Hear Missionaries” Findlay Republican Courier, 24 November 1930, p3
Click to make bigger



Transcription:

TO HEAR MISSIONARIES
__________
Two Women Home from South China to Speak at Mount Olivet Tabernacle Wednesday Night

Miss Myrtle Bailey and Mr. Florence Cannell, missionaries on furlough from South China, will speak at 8 o’clock Wednesday evening at Mount Olivet Tabernacle, 109 North Blanchard Street.

Ms. Bailey is a native of Findlay and a graduate of the Christian and Missionary Alliance school at Nyack N.Y.

Ms. Cannell has been a public speaker since the age of 12.

Rev. O. C. Ballard, pastor, said special music was expected to be furnished by Mrs. Phyllis Frye and Mrs. Christine Buntz of Findlay.

[Phyllis (Snyder) Frye and Christine (Snyder) Buntz are her nieces.]


Climbing My Family Tree: ”Missionary to Speak”, Findlay Republican Courier, 17 April 1937,  p10
”Missionary to Speak”, Findlay Republican Courier, 17 April 1937,  p10
Click to make bigger

Transcription:

MISSIONARY TO SPEAK
________
Miss Myrtle Bailey, Home from Far East, to Tell Hazards of Work in the Field

Miss Myrtle Bailey, a former Findlay woman who has been in missionary work in the Far East for several years, will tell of the hazards and trials of a missionary in an address at the Lynn Street Church of God at 7:45 PM Sunday. Her subjects will be “What Are the Duties of a Missionary.”

An accordion solo by Harold Todd and a cornet solo by Mrs. Phyllis Fry, will be given.

[Phyllis (Snyder) Frye is her niece.]


Climbing My Family Tree: ”Bible school to grant diplomas” Findlay Republican Courier, 7 May 1937, p 5
”Bible school to grant diplomas” Findlay Republican Courier, 7 May 1937, p 5
Click to make bigger



BIBLE SCHOOL TO GRANT DIPLOMAS
___________

Annual Commencement Exercises to Be Held at 8 O’clock This Evening
___________

Commencement exercises will be held at the Bible and Missionary Training school, Lima avenue, at 8 o’clock this evening, open to the public. For diplomas are to be awarded by the principal, Mrs. E. H. Wurmser.

The graduates are Miss Louise Reimen, Cleveland; Mrs. Edna Brand, Cleveland; Miss Jane Westcott, Exeter, Can.; and Miss Edith Gales, Melrose, Mass. 

Following is the program for the exercises:

Song, by school. “Jesus Is Coming Soon,” by Howard E, Smith.

Scripture reading and prayer, Rev. John E. Norton, Findlay, returned missionary from India.

Address, Mrs. Edna brand, “the Power of God.”

Chorus, “Study to Show Thyself Approved,” by class.

Missionary address, Miss Myrtle Bailey, Hong Kong, China.

Duet, “That Gentle Call,” Herbert G. Tovey, Miss J. Cobb, Miss Ruth Haley.

Address, “A Vision and Call,” Ms. Louise Reimen.

Chorus by the class, “All Power Is Given unto Me.”

Awarding of diplomas, Principal Mrs. E. H. Wurmser.

Duet, “Have I Forgotten,” H. Mosel, Mrs. Edna Brand, Miss Louise Reimen.

Prayer, Mrs. John E. Norton.

The children school of instruction and training will have a Junior recognition program at 2 PM Saturday. Stereopical (sic) views of child life in China, will be shown by Miss Myrtle Bailey and Ms. Josephine Cobb, missionaries on furlough. Refreshments will be served to the juniors in the dining rooms of the Bible school, at the conclusion of the program.

Myrtle was given permission to return to Hong Kong at the start of the Second Sino-Japanese War  (1937-1945).   On the date of the below article (but likely not yet known to the general U.S.), the Japanese invaded and eventually captured Nanking, the capital of the Republic of China. The invasion later became known as the Nanking Massacre. (See The Rape of Nanking, by Iris Chang, a popular nonfiction book on the subject, first published in 1997. My parents gave it to me for my birthday some years ago; I’ll never be able to forget it.[My parents know that I've read extensively about WWII, about both the European and Pacific theaters; it's not a weird present for me.])   




Climbing My Family Tree: ”War-torn China goal of woman” Findlay Republican Courier, 13 December 1937, p3
”War-torn China goal of woman” Findlay Republican Courier, 13 December 1937, p3
Click to make bigger




Transcription:

WAR TORN CHINA GOAL OF WOMAN

Without Fear Miss Bailey Leaves Findlay to Resume Missionary Work The

On a "go-at-your-own-risk" permit issued by the State Department, Miss Myrtle Bailey left Findlay Saturday for war-torn China happy in the knowledge she would be with her Chinese boy and girl Bible students whom she left behind two years ago. Although the country is not now as peaceful as when she left, Miss Bailey has no fears for her safety she told friends. Despite the fact that severe fighting has been going on in many regions of China, Hong Kong has been comparatively unharmed since it is a British Colony and the section is heavily patrolled by the British army and navy so that anxiety is minimized, according to Mrs. Philip Snyder, 524 Tiffin Avenue, with whom Miss Bailey made her home much of the past year. The greatest existing danger, Miss Bailey told her sister, is that huge quantities of munitions are stored in several secret ammunition dumps in the Hong Kong district and a stray shell or other accident might set one of them off and probably cause a heavy loss of property and life.

Miss Bailey has been a Pentecostal missionary in China for the past 21 years. Injured seriously when struck by a street car in Hong Kong, she spent some time in a hospital and was forced to take a two year furlough just now ending. She has regained her health and was greatly pleased when the State Department gave her permission to return, Mrs. Snyder said. Having lived among her charges so long Miss Bailey has become deeply attached to her charges and regards Hong Kong as her home. Three assistants have been conducting the two English and Bible schools she established during her absence.

Miss Bailey is now en route to the Pacific Coast and on arriving in San Francisco will embark immediately for China. During her visit Miss Bailey addressed numerous gatherings.


______________________________________________________

First in series: Myrtle Bailey and the Second Chinese Revolution 

All newspaper articles found at NewspaperARCHIVE.com

Saturday, May 16, 2015

NoteWorthy Reads Weekend Off

NoteWorthy Reads #14 will be posted next weekend.

I've been off having fun with friends and family, and am spending Saturday and Sunday with My love and my aunt & uncle at the South Carolina Book Festival in Columbia - Dorothea Benton Frank is going to be there! And Rick Bragg! Oh boy! (I was a bookworm long before I got the genealogy bug, love the SC and TX book festivals.)

I hope your weekend is fun!

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Myrtle Bailey and the Second Chinese Revolution

My great grand aunt Myrtle Bailey (1880-1970) lived through extremely interesting historical times in her life as a missionary to China in the first half of the 20th century. Although I’ve already written a post on her early in my first year of blogging, I thought I would share  how I found out about the exciting events in her life by doing a mini-series posting the newspaper articles I found and doing transcriptions of them so that they are easier to read. Conveniently, she lived through about one major historical event per decade, and so I will divide the miniseries into decades. This first post covers the mid-1920s, when Myrtle lived through a portion of the second Chinese revolution and was forced to evacuate from Fat Shan, China.






Climbing My Family Tree: 30 January 1924 The Morning Republican (Findlay Ohio) p. 2
30 January 1924 The Morning Republican (Findlay Ohio) p. 2
Click to Make Bigger



Transcription:

Miss Myrtle Bailey who spent five years in China as a missionary will speak in the frame church in Gilboa, Thursday evening at 7:30 o’clock. She will return to China in the near future.



Climbing My Family Tree: 17 July 1925 The Portsmouth Daily Times (Portsmouth Ohio) p. 2
17 July 1925 The Portsmouth Daily Times (Portsmouth Ohio) p. 2
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Transcription:


MISSIONARY TO BE RETURNED TO FINDLAY

Miss Myrtle Bailey, Findlay, missionary to China, has been caught in the revolution in that country and an appeal here yesterday was promptly answered when the Assemblies of God church cabled her $400 for her passage from Hong Kong to Findlay.



Climbing My Family Tree: 17 July 1925 The Morning Republican (Findlay, Ohio) p.2
17 July 1925 The Morning Republican (Findlay, Ohio) p.2
Click to Make Bigger




Transcription:


CABLES $400 TO FINDLAY WOMAN TO ESCAPE ORIENT

Missionary, Life IN Peril as Result of War, Sends to Findlay for Funds – Sum is at Once Dispatched to Allow Her to Return to U.S.


Having fled to the city of Hong Kong, China, for safety in the war stricken Orient, Miss Myrtle Bailey, missionary of this city, cabled for financial aid to embark at once for the United States, and $400 was dispatched to her yesterday morning by the Assembly of God, 406 E. Sandusky Street.

Requests Funds

When the message calling for financial help was received here, a campaign was immediately launched to secure the $400 asked for by Miss Bailey. The amount of the money, however, was borrowed and wired to the Secretary of the Assembly of God in Springfield, Missouri, who, in turn, cabled it to Hong Kong. Miss Bailey will probably receive the money, it was said, probably today.

Work of securing the $400 to take care of the borrowed amount was begun yesterday under the direction of Mrs. Thomas K. Leonard, wife of Rev. Leonard, who is out of the city. Late in the afternoon, Mrs. Leonard reported $200 had been secured and predicted the goal of $400 would be reached today. Many ready responses were had.  


Ordered to Leave

All foreigners have been ordered to leave China, according to information received by Mrs. Leonard. Many of the missionaries have fled to larger cities for safety, Miss Bailey taking refuge in Hong Kong with several others.

Some of the missionaries, according to Mrs. Leonard, have received ill treatment, Chinese calling the “dogs” in their hurried flights.

Miss Bailey went to China about two years ago, according to Assemblies of God informants. Previously she had spent a period of nine years in the missionary field in China.

She is the daughter of E.C. Bailey, 519 Hull Ave.





Climbing My Family Tree: 12 September 1925 The Morning Republican (Findlay, Ohio), p.9
12 September 1925 The Morning Republican (Findlay, Ohio), p.9
Click To Make Bigger



Transcription:


MISSIONARY, COMPELLED TO LEAVE CHINA, RETURNS HERE


Miss Myrtle Bailey Arrives in Findlay From Orient – Relates Impressions

That China will eventually rid herself of the Bolshevistic tendencies now surfeited, was the opinion expressed yesterday by Miss Myrtle Bailey, 519 Hull Avenue, who has return to Findlay after having fled from her missionary station to escape the dangers of civil warfare.

Miss Bailey is a missionary of the Assemblies of God and has spent seven years in China. Her Headquarters were in Fat Shan, a community of between 800,000 and 1,000,000 persons not far from Canton. She hastily quit the city at the warning of a friend a short time before the American Consul ordered out all American citizens lest their lives be endangered by the warring factions.

For China Alone

"China for the Chinese” is the slogan that has been adopted by the scholars of that nation in an effort to forward the interests of the native residents. Antipathy towards Americans is not pronounced according to Miss Bailey. The chief opposition to the Chinese is to the English and the Japanese who have been boycotted in an attempt to advance the cause of Chinese supremacy.

For days before the American Consul ordered citizens of the United States to quit the city, Miss Bailey had been conscious of a sinister sentiment that pervaded the region.

Her coworker, Miss Mattie Ledbetter, whose home is in Alabama, had left Fat Shan because of broken health. On her way to Hong Kong she saw a fleet of gunboats loaded with soldiers formerly commanded by Dr. Sun Yat Sen who were on their way to attack the Yuananese troops that occupied Fat Shan and Canton.

Miss Ledbetter immediately dispatched word to Miss Bailey, informing her of the situation. Quickly assembling her belongings, she left posthaste for Hong Kong. Shortly afterward the edict for Americans to retire from the city was issued. So great was the necessity for speed that those washing their clothing packed the garments while they were still wet.


Decides To Return

At Hong Kong a council of all missionaries from the sector of the hostilities assembled. It was decided to attempt to return to their post before eight months. Some believed it would take longer and some doubted they would ever be able to return. Miss Bailey wired the local congregation for funds and later embarked for America on the Empress of Australia. She arrived in Findlay Sunday morning.

According to the Findlay woman, there are three types of Chinese in the nation of Celestials. One element is the ignorant class whom hold to the customs of the past. Another group is a class of substantial citizens of the commercial type who have tolerant views concerning foreigners. The third classification takes in students who as a rule are extremely radical and who have been fired by Bolshevistic ideas.


The southern part of China does not recognize the Peking government. Dr. Sen attained power in the south by arms. Later he was forced to hide from his enemies. He finally set up a Soviet government.

The city of Fat Shan, which is subsidiary to Canton, had organized a militia for protection. The Yuananese troops from a province by that name on the west managed to secure the arms of the Home Guard by stealth. Fat Shan capitulated without resistance.
Turn Towards Canton

In June the troops that had supported Dr. Sen before his death turned towards Canton determined to drive out the Yuananese. It was then that Miss Bailey left her station. There was practically no fighting in Fat Shan but in adjacent Canton the fighting was intense. Events of indescribable brutality took place according to the missionary. The Yuananese were defeated and withdrew from Canton and Fat Shan.

Agitation of a radical nature was in evidence when Miss Bailey entered China 7 years ago she said. The foreign quarters of Canton are on an island in the Canton River which is called Shameen. A huge patriotic parade was produced by the Chinese students of the city.

When the procession reached the bridge leading to the Shameen, a number of shots were fired into the groups of foreigners. The gunboats on the river and the machine guns on the island returned fire.

The shots that opened the fray are supposed to have been fired by Bolshevists. One Frenchman was killed. The affair served as fuel for increasing the hostilities it is said.

Handbills with a picture of a heart with a dagger thrust through it were used by the Chinese to notify the natives the boycott against the English was in effect in Hong Kong. The English issued a counter edict stating all natives who refused to work must leave the city. Thousands did.

Miss Bailey has an optimistic view of conditions in China and believes the time will come when she can continue her work there. She returned to Findlay on furlough about one and a half years ago.



Climbing My Family Tree: 26 March 1927 The Morning Republican (Findlay Ohio) p. 9
26 March 1927 The Morning Republican (Findlay Ohio) p. 9
Click To Make Bigger



Transcription:


CHURCH WORKERS BELIEVED SAFE

Local Missionaries In China In No Immediate Danger, Belief

Findlay persons, who have journeyed to the Orient in the hope of spreading the gospel message are apparently in no immediate danger, according to their friends and relatives who have been keeping close touch with the China situation.

Miss Georgia Weist, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Weist, who is a missionary from St. Paul’s evangelical church is not in the danger zone, it is believed, as she is stationed 900 miles from Nanking.

Cablegrams received by Mrs. E. H. Wurmser, head of the Bible and Missionary Training School are to the effect that the missionaries who have gone out from the local school to China are located in the coastal cities, either in Shanghai or Hong Kong.

Miss Josephine Cobb of the city, a graduate of the training school, is among the missionaries in China. Her sister, Miss Lenora Cobb, is on the faculty of the training school. Miss Myrtle Bailey, also Findlay and a graduate of the school, is reported safe in China.

Other graduates of the training school who are now missionaries in China are Mr. and Mrs. Ollaf Firm, Miss Catherine Clouse, Miss Jenny Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert Williamson, and Mrs. Anna Bush.



[All newspaper articles found at NewspaperArchive.com.]


Next Installment will cover the 1930s.

Monday, May 11, 2015

NoteWorthy Reads #13

Climbing My Family Tree: NoteWorthy Reads #13
Picture from Pixabay.com

For week ending May 9, 2015,

For me, Noteworthy Reads are articles, websites, or blog posts I found this week which are fascinating, interesting and/or helpful, and occasionally “wacky” or “wonderful” will likely sneak in as well. It’s not going to be a “best of” post because I don’t have the knowledge to make that determination. I don’t even promise that the articles & blog posts will be written that week – just that I found them that week. At the end of each trimester I’ll review the posts to determine which entries should be put in my Resource pages; the rest will still be available through the blog's search function.

Note: Just because I list an article does not mean I endorse its contents; it just means I want to be able to find it easily in the future when I may want to consider the issue in more depth.

I'm late in posting. I've been cleaning like a mad woman. What started out as "My parents are coming to visit, I need to straighten up a bit." turned into full-bore spring cleaning! I'm tired, stiff, and sore, but my apartment is CLEAN!

As you might guess, I'm behind in my reading. I'll catch up at some point.but there are some really interesting articles and helpful resources in what I did manage to get read.


ENGLAND

Criminal Ancestors Records from Genealogy UK  – a list of links to searchable databases of historical criminal records throughout Great Britain.

Genealogy UK blog  – a short daily post, with a link, listing some sort of unique database for genealogical purposes in Great Britain or Ireland [note to self: in Resources cross-post to Ireland and Scotland].


GERMANY

German/Prussian Mega Search Engine, from Many-Roads.com – The search engine accesses 108 German & Prussian Genealogy sites at once (almost all results in German).  Thankfully, I’ve got a cousin who is fluent in German who loves to translate old records; for those who don’t, Google Translate can be helpful.


HISTORY


The Great Appalachian Hog Drives from Atlas Obscura – I never knew – fascinating


INTERESTING ARTICLE

Facts Matter!, from The Legal Genealogist’s blog – if you’ve seen the article going around saying that Ancestry.com is releasing DNA to the police, please read this, as the story making the rounds is inaccurate on key points (based on my own research into the matter) and the Legal Genealogist explains it well.


My Cousin Is the Pope – and it’s Everything  – she’s Jewish but her genealogy research has shown that she is related to Pope Benedict XVI



TIPS



Genealogy 101: County Research from ColonialRoots.com’s blog– “county lines change over time, and researchers need to be aware of those changes. Otherwise, you may think records do not exist when, in fact, they do exist in a different county.”




TOOLS

One-step Webpages by Stephen P Morse that “This site contains tools for finding immigration records, census records, vital records, and for dealing with calendars, maps, foreign alphabets, and numerous other applications. Some of these tools fetch data from other websites but do so in more versatile ways than the search tools provided on those websites.” Very Useful.

Geneabloggers.comhuge directory of over 3000 genealogy and family history blogs and a way to search all 3000 at once

Rootsweb huge free genealogical community, with lots of information and message boards




Saturday, May 2, 2015

NoteWorthy Reads #12

picture from Pixabay.com


For week ending May 1, 2015

For me, Noteworthy Reads are articles, websites, or blog posts I found this week which are fascinating, interesting and/or helpful, and occasionally “wacky” or “wonderful” will likely sneak in as well. It’s not going to be a “best of” post because I don’t have the knowledge to make that determination. I don’t even promise that the articles & blog posts will be written that week – just that I found them that week. At the end of each trimester I’ll review the posts to determine which entries should be put in my Resource pages; the rest will still be available through the blog's search function.

Note: Just because I list an article does not mean I endorse its contents. It just means I want to be able to find it easily in the future when I may want to consider the issue in more depth.


CANADA

Am I Descended from a Loyalist? from the Family Tree Knots blog  – how to determine whether your ancestor may be a Loyalist.


DNA

DNA Lectures YouTube Channel, from DNA-eXplained – Genetic Genealogy blog  (or should this be under Education?)


FUN

How Mad Men Will Really End – with a Shaky Leaf from the Clue Wagon blog – such fun for Mad Men fans (I’ve never watched it and it was still fun).

Peter Pan’s Midlife Crisis, from On Granny’s Trail blog – fun, Peter and divorce records


GREAT STORIES

The Sad Death of Margaret (McKenzie) Clark and Her Children, from the Genealogist on a Journey blog – a very well written and sad story.

A Tale of Sarah Hood and the Salem Witch Trials from the Genealogy with Valerie blog – in ancestor indicted in the Salem witch trials


HISTORY



War as Waiter: Soldier Servants from the Journal of the American Revolution – serving the war effort as an officer’s servant


INTERESTING ARTICLE




IRELAND

Irish Valuation Records: Tracing Tenancy and Ownership of the Family Home: Warblestown found at “On a Flesh and Blood Foundation”: an Irish History blog – “Property valuation records are an important resource for learning about the places in which our ancestors lived in the land of Ireland.” An interesting ‘how to’ article with pictures.

  
Irish Genealogy Resource with 400,000 Catholic Parish Records to Go Online from siliconrepublic.comThe entire collection of Catholic parish register microfilms held by the National Library of Ireland, considered the single most important source of information on Irish family history prior to the 1901 Census and dating from the 1740s to the 1880s, is to be made available online July 8, 2015.

SCOTLAND

The Scottish Emigration Database – “currently contains the records of over 21,000 passengers who embarked at Glasgow and Greenock for non-European ports between 1 January and 30 April 1923, and at other Scottish ports between 1890 and 1960.”


TIPS

Cemetery Records –What can they tell you? How do you use them? from Michigan Family Trails blog = Interesting. I didn’t know you could get that much information from a cemetery record




Being an Actor and Filing a Record from the Thinking Genealogically blog – A pastor’s point of view of filing marriage records, as the one who does so, can help us in our search of such records.




TOOLS

Blank Census Forms (U.S., U.K., Can.), by Ancestry.com – Now, I can read what all those heading-questions are!


Manifest Markings: A Guide to Interpreting Passenger List Annotations – “These web pages are intended to provide a comprehensive reference guide to interpreting the markings, or annotations, found on immigration passenger lists. It is written for researchers with a U.S. passenger list in hand.”

Tools of the Trade: JSTOR from the blog at D. Joshua Taylor, Forward in Family History - JSTOR is a fascinating resource to learn more about the times and culture in which our ancestors lived, and, sometimes, about our ancestors themselves.

Randy Seaver at the Genea-Musings blog continues his explanatory series on the use of the new tool for genealogists, Historylines.com with




(See NoteWorthy Reads #11 for links to the first three installments)


USA- NEW YORK