Saturday, March 14, 2015

NoteWorthy Reads #6

Climbing My Family Tree: NoteWorthy Reads #6
photo via
For week-ending 3/14/15

For me, Noteworthy Reads are articles, websites, or blogposts I found this week which are fascinating, interesting and/or helpful, and occasionally “wacky” or “wonderful” will likely sneak in as well. It’s not going to be a “best of” post because I don’t have the knowledge to make that determination. I don’t even promise that the articles & blogposts will be written that week – just that I found them that week. At the end of each quarter I’ll review the posts to determine which entries should be put in my Resource pages; the rest will still be available through the blog's search function.

Note: Just because I list an article does not mean I endorse its contents. It just means I want to be able to find it easily in the future when I may want to consider the issue in more depth.


20 Do’s and Don’ts of DNA  from Roots Revealed blog – read the comments as well.


James Tanner of Genealogy’s Star  has been running a series on Understanding Real Property Legal Descriptions For Genealogists. This week’s entry was on Homesteading. Thus far he has 10 other entries in this series; there are links to them at the bottom of this post.


Geneapalooza Genealogy Panel Cartoons. *snert!*  Go Look!

19 Strange Professions of Your Ancestors That Don’t Exist Today  – from the Crest Leaf blog. Made me feel OLD since I worked during college and law school as # 2! (Other than the outfits, it was virtually the same as the picture.)



Becoming A Legal Person (Canada – Women) from ‘On a Flesh and Bone Foundation’: and Irish History blog  Women weren't people until 1929 in Canada! The story of how the law was changed to recognize women as people.

“Deputy Husbands”  from Vita Brevis - In 18th & 19th centuries women could sometimes act as surrogates for their husbands in business 

IMAGES (for illustration of family story or for blogging)

Flickr: The Commons – List of Participating Institutions [click on each institutions’ icon to get to their collection] hidden treasures from the world's public photography archives, with no known copyright restrictions. Includes images from Internet Archive Book Images; Museums from Great Britain, France, Finland, Sweden, Finland, Australia, USA, Mennonites, Ireland, NASA, Scotland, etc.; the Law Society of Upper Canada (this is not remotely an exhaustive list – go look!)


Irish Genealogy: 70 Top Resources for Finding your Irish Ancestors from the Crest Leaf blog.  Wow! This just made my research of my Bailey and Bennett lines much easier!

Irish Societies Make Journal Articles Available Online from The British GENES Blog. This will help in researching my Irish ancestors, too! 


How To Easily Translate a French Website into English (or just about any other combination of languages) from the Genealogy al la Carte blog 

Asking For Help The Right Way by Aunt Barb’s Papers - How to make sure your request for help in a Facebook genealogy group, or other social media setting, isn't "set up for failure".


Katherine R. Willson’s Updated List “Genealogy on Facebook”  4,500 + links to genea groups  from the Genealogy al la Carte blog 


Sons of the American Revolution Patriot & Grave Index  - database of Revolutionary War patriots gravesites 


Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections  -  hoping this will be helpful for my Erwin, Conley, Craig lines 


  1. Thanks for including my blog post about Blog Books on your list this week!

    1. You're welcome. I was happy to find such a good explanation because I think I want to do that.

  2. Thank you Jo for including my post in your Noteworthy Reads this week! It's great company and I appreciate it!

    1. You're welcome, Cindy. It's a great story!

  3. Hi Jo, Thank you for including my blog post in your Noteworthy Reads #6!

    1. You're welcome, Barb. It's full of really good advice!


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